Shivom Partners With Lifebit

Blockchain genomics pioneer and AI data analysis firm will provide pharmaceutical organisations and life science users with comprehensive reporting through a library of pipelines

London, United Kingdom – 11 December 2018 – Shivom, the blockchain genomics platform that is powering personalized healthcare, has partnered with Lifebit, the AI-powered DNA-analysis firm, to give users unprecedented reporting capabilities for DNA data analysis.

The partnership will mean that immediate Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) analysis is possible, with no specialist knowledge or in-house data scientist required. It also means that users can access a library of pipelines (ready built softwares that are used for analysis) and an AI-powered toolkit for analysing the data in a way that is far more scalable than other solutions.

Another aspect that makes the Shivom platform superior to other genomics platforms is that it will give pharmaceutical organisations and life science users the ability to access real-time analysis whenever they need it with no waiting time, no application process for accessing the data and deadlines or cut off dates that restrict their access.

“Through this partnership with Lifebit, we are providing enterprise users with the tools they need to find the right patients for their clinical trials more easily and more accurately than is possible through other solutions. Not only that, it brings AI into GWAS analysis in a way that hasn’t been seen before,” said Dr Axel Schumacher, Co-Founder and Chief Scientific of Shivom.

The use of genomics platforms to improve rare disease treatment has increased in recent months, with 23andMe partnering with GlaxoSmithKline to develop drugs for Parkinson’s. However, the Shivom Lifebit partnership demonstrates a major leap forward in this area because it adds AI and Machine Learning capabilities to the identification of potential patients.

To do this, users will be able to access a library of pipelines within the Shivom platform. These include preset Shivom pipelines, those created through open source software and any that an enterprise chooses to develop using Github and DOCKER services.

“Our partnership with Shivom will allow us to combine unique datasets with a level of analysis automation and insight generation that has never been seen before on a genomics platform,” said Dr. Maria Chatzou, co-founder and CEO of Lifebit. “In this way, scientists and doctors will be able to get all the benefits of this rich database without the need to rely on a data scientist for help. On the other hand, still ensuring that the individuals that have provided data to Shivom are given a level of security and control only a state-of-art blockchain technology can offer.”

The partnership with Lifebit comes with the Shivom platform having already been released in alpha. The full launch of the platform is expected in Q1 2019.

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Media Contact:
Frances Wells
Cryptoland PR
E: frances@cryptolandpr.com
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About Shivom:
Shivom is powering the next era of genomics through blockchain technology – protecting identity, personalizing healthcare and transforming lives. For the first time ever, a precision medicine ecosystem will offer an open web-marketplace for other providers to add not only genomics information, but also analytics and associated apps and services to drive personalized medicine. Shivom intends to extend its services to form a global network of associated laboratories and research centres, as well as genetic counsellors and other relevant services.  For further information, please visit: https://shivom.io/

About Lifebit
Lifebit is building a cloud-based cognitive system that can reason about DNA data like humans do. This offers researchers/R&D professionals, and their corresponding organisations (ie. pharmas), a highly scalable, modular and reproducible system that automates the analysis processes, learns from the data and provides actionable insights. For further information, please visit: https://lifebit.ai

Our Alpha Public Release!

Alpha Public Release
Alpha Public Release

Back in August, we announced that we would be releasing a platform in order for our community to test and give us feedback on the first iteration of our Alpha product.

After onboarding a wealth of new talent and welcoming Henry Ines to the role of CEO, we felt it time to take a step back and reassess our current position. We realised that many of our competitors, both startups in the blockchain space and traditional genetics companies had spent a significant amount of time streamlining their UI/UX and USPs. It became clear to us that we needed to innovate in an area that’s often overlooked – secure storage. In perfecting such a solution, we would be able to offer our community and competitors alike greater freedom and transparency where the storage and sharing of their DNA data is concerned, having a positive knock-on effect on the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry.

Months of development later, after several scrum meetings and all-nighters, we’re thrilled to unveil to the community the long-awaited Alpha Release!


A Sleek UI/UX Brand Overhaul

Users will also notice that we’ve greatly simplified our sign-up process, stripping it down to three easy steps:

Select whether you’re a consumer or an enterprise user, before adding general account information (name, DOB, country, etc.)

Complete health and wellness information by answering a range of questions (which, in later releases, will not only help us better assess which products we should provide our audience with, but also improve the search function for organisations seeking particular DNA datasets). Of course, the user will be able to specify whether they wish to be ‘discoverable’ in our Enterprise Search feature.

The final step in the sign-up process is adjusting user permissions – you’ll be able to set search, viewing and contact permissions that are linked to DNA data uploaded onto the platform. We’ve implemented toggle functionality to offer users a more granular experience over categories. For instance, they may choose to only make their data searchable and available to academic research teams over governmental organisations.

DNA Upload & Encryption

As aforementioned, we’ve spent countless hours fine-tuning our secure storage feature whilst ensuring newcomers and users of previous genetic testing kits are provided with a seamless experience for securely uploading their data. If you’ve used another testing service previously, all you need is your genetic information to get started – usually, this is stored in a file with a .vcf extension.

Navigate to the MYDNA page and click on ‘Upload’ to select the requisite file from your device. Once selected, it will be encrypted and subsequently stored on the Shivom platform. In successive releases, expect an even simpler process, where logins for sites like 23andMe or Ancestry can be used in order to directly import data.

Additionally, this page allows you to pre-order home testing kits. Select this option to be added to the pre-order list for the kits, which will be shipped in Q1 of 2019.

 

What’s Next?

Shivom will continue iterating on its product and fleshing out our core features – above all, our work is driven with a focus on security and accessibility. In tandem, we’ll launch numerous upgrades to campaign management for enterprise users and our Enterprise Search function (providing granular filters for organisations seeking out specific data sets, i.e. those from specific regions, associated with certain diseases or conditions, etc.).

For users that wish to share their data with researchers or institutes in the medical field (all whilst being remunerated for their participation), we’ll be rolling out the ability to anonymously provide organisations with datasets within a set timeframe, leveraging blockchain-based payments directly into an integrated wallet accessible via Shivom’s web portal.

Stay tuned for more exciting updates on our roadmap, developments and partnerships in the coming weeks. Go ahead and experiment with the Alpha, and be sure to let us know what you like, what could be improved, and what you’d like to see added in the future via the Intercom feature at the bottom right-hand side of the portal.

Until next time,

The Shivom Team

Shivom Announces Token Buyback Plans

SHIVOM Announces Token Buyback Plans in Preparation for Platform Rollout in 2019
SHIVOM Announces Token Buyback Plans in Preparation for Platform Rollout in 2019

Shivom is pleased to announce its plans to buyback up to 30 million OMX tokens or approximately 5% of current circulating supply in preparation for Shivom’s beta platform release plans in 2019. Beyond simply removing some OMX from current market conditions, Shivom plans to allocate the repurchased OMX tokens exclusively for incentivizing early adopters and driving community engagement on the Shivom platform.

According to Shivom CEO Henry Ines, “the buyback program is part of a multi-prong strategy to accelerate growth of the Shivom ecosystem, onboard new users, drive community awareness and engagement and ultimately to further enhance the value of the Shivom platform and the OMX token ecosystem.”

The repurchased tokens will be utilized to provide incentives and benefits particularly to new users, who upload their existing genomic data file on to Shivom’s secure platform and for those who purchase Shivom-branded kits and services in 2019. The buyback program will commence on 01 November 2018 and is expected to conclude by 31 January 2019.

In the interim period, Shivom also plans to release its ‘alpha’ platform on a limited basis for early testing and feedback purposes. The company in parallel also continues to advance its clinical R&D and pilot projects.

Stay tuned for more exciting announcements!

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National Diabetes Awareness Month: Pinpointing Treatment

National Diabetes Awareness Month Pinpointing Treatment
National Diabetes Awareness Month Pinpointing Treatment

We live in a world where everyone knows someone who has diabetes.  The disease is characterized by the inability to produce or effectively use insulin, it is

rapidly on the rise and becoming one of the leading causes of death worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately four million people die from complications due to diabetes or high blood glucose levels (WHO, http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/diabetes).  The fact that

80 percent of those afflicted are in middle to low-income countries, and cannot

or do not visit a medical professional regularly makes detection, diagnosis and

treatment all the more difficult.  WHO also reports that the number of people with diabetes has quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million people in 2014, with India having the largest population of adult diabetics (74 million, IDF) on the planet.

Diabetes has been manageable for most patients since insulin treatments were first pioneered in the 1920s, but it still remains undiagnosed in 24 to 62 percent of the world’s population. (WHO http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/204871/9789241565257_eng.pdf;jsessionid=6C39C7451F038C0EDDCED7B9528C7FE5?sequence=1).  The risk of not being diagnosed or receiving improper and insufficient treatment is catastrophic, potentially leading to blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation.  Undiagnosed cases will be a core issue throughout National Diabetes Month in the United States, where over 30 million people live with the disease (Center for Disease Control https://www.cdc.gov/features/livingwithdiabetes/index.html) but many more remain undiagnosed and untreated.   

Genomic medicine and next-generation sequencing has seen the fastest progress to date in being able to identify genetic markers for diabetes in patients, and particularly being able to diagnose the most accurate type of diabetes they may have.  For both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, genomic sequencing can reveal many significant risk factors but cannot fully predict the onset of any particular condition. The specific combination of genetic markers correlated to increased risk is complicated, and a few dozen genes of many variants have been found to contribute a risk to one or both forms of the disease. Given this complex relationship, the disease cannot be accurately predicted in either form. Some rarer cases, however, can be predicted from pinpointing just one particular gene, but all of these monogenic forms of diabetes are extremely rare.  

Genomic medicine is also at the heart of managing and treating the disease and can be most effective in being able to inform doctors and patients of the exact type of diabetes that is present.  In both cases, physical activity is important, with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommending being active at least three times a week. For the undiagnosed, being checked for prediabetes (a high blood sugar condition that falls short of the definition of Type 2 diabetes) and healthy weight management are also strong ways to mitigate risk factors. For those who are diabetic patients, management is key, and balancing a healthy diet and regular blood sugar testing with treatments like insulin can mitigate the risk of the more serious symptoms associated with the disease. Still, symptoms of these risks should still be monitored closely, and a medical professional should be notified if any issue related to the patient’s diabetes arises.

The specific relationship between the human genome and all forms of diabetes is a lively field of study, one that could lead to a breakthrough on par with that of Banting and Best’s first insulin treatments. One such opportunity is in India, where Project Shivom has partnered with Genetic Technologies Limited on a pilot program meant to find a genomic answer for the nation’s unusually high rate of Type 2 diabetes. See here for more about how we’re using blockchain to combat Type 2 diabetes in India. (LINK: https://medium.com/projectshivom/blockchain-to-combat-type-2-diabetes-epidemic-in-india-1856f460bac5).